Mindfulness therapy as good as medication for chronic depression – study

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) may be just as effective as anti-depressants in helping prevent people with chronic depression from relapsing, scientists said on Tuesday.

Depression is one of the most common forms of mental illness, affecting more than 350 million people worldwide. It is ranked by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of disability globally.

Treatment usually involves either medication, some form of psychotherapy or a combination of both. Yet many patients fail to get better and suffer recurring bouts of illness.

Generation meds: the US children who grow up on prescription drugs

In America, medication is becoming almost as much a staple of childhood as Disney and McDonald’s. Kids pack their pills for school or college along with their lunch money. Some are taking drugs for depression and anxiety, others for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The right drugs at the right time can save young people from profound distress and enable them to concentrate in class. But some adolescents, critics say, are given medication to mask the ordinary emotional turmoil of growing up; there is a risk that they will never learn to live without it.

“In the middle-class, educated group in New York, you probably are seeing kids who are just under more academic pressure,” she says. “Parents will begin to look at psychiatric diagnosis and treatment with drugs as one option for making children perform better. You have parents saying, ‘My child must be on Ritalin because all the other children in the class are.’”

 

Thicker brain sections tied to spirituality

For people at high risk of depression because of a family history,  spirituality may offer some protection for the brain, a new study hints.

Parts of the brain’s outer layer, the cortex, were thicker in high-risk study participants who said religion or spirituality was  “important” to them versus those who cared less about religion.

“Our beliefs and our moods are reflected in our brain and with new imaging techniques we can begin to see this,” Myrna Weissman told  Reuters Health. “The brain is an extraordinary organ. It not only controls, but is controlled by our moods.”

Mindfulness therapy as good as medication for chronic depression

Comment:   this article shows how the mind can be as effective as drugs when combatting depression. Also, though not mentioned, so can prayer and scripture (reading, meditating)—perhaps even more so.

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) may be just as effective as anti-depressants in helping prevent people with chronic depression from relapsing, scientists said on Tuesday.

Depression is one of the most common forms of mental illness, affecting more than 350 million people worldwide. It is ranked by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of disability globally.

Treatment usually involves either medication, some form of psychotherapy or a combination of both. Yet many patients fail to get better and suffer recurring bouts of illness.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Manny: The Ash Wednesday Diet

Let me introduce you to The Ash Wednesday Diet.

Come on, keep reading. Because by the time you finish this diet, you’re going to shed enough emotional weight to prepare yourself to lead a healthy life, and enjoy many years of happiness.

 

Message decoded, again: 3,000-year-old text may prove biblical tale of

A few characters scratched into the side of an ancient earthenware jug have archaeologists scrambling for their dictionaries — and wondering if it corroborates the Bible’s stories of King Solomon.

The Ophel inscription — 3,000-year-old characters found in Israel in July — is the earliest alphabetical written text ever found in
Jerusalem. It proves the real basis behind the parables and stories in the world’s most famous book, said Gershon Galil, a professor of ancient history and biblical studies at the University of Haifa.

“We are dealing here with real kings, and the kingdom of David and Solomon was a real fact,” Galil told FoxNews.com, in a phone call from Israel.

 

 

 

Time shift creates Sabbath ‘joke’

If you thought the debate over the biblical Sabbath has been settled, think again.

The issue over God’s mandated day of rest mentioned in the Fourth Commandment remains in dispute in Samoa, and the New Zealand Herald reports, “Divine intervention may be needed to help resolve [the] dilemma.”

 

Being Alone As Bad As Smoking, Excessive Drinking

More Americans are choosing to live alone than ever before. And while it’s healthy to have “down time” by yourself, one study says too much alone time may shorten your life.

They found people who said they were lonely, felt socially isolated or lived alone, had a 30 percent increased likelihood of death.

 

Did co-ed killer channel Satan?

Editorial:  Once again we see there are no true athiests. Either we acknowledge someone or thing our superior diety, or we make self a god, establishing our own standards for life and laws–even upon others. This misguided murderer and soul makes this ever so clear.

In the biblical account of the Garden of Eden, the ancient serpent – later described as “the devil, or Satan” – tempted the first humans by declaring if they defied their Creator, “Ye shall be as gods.”

Those haunting words were echoed in a video released by Elliot Rodger, the 22-year-old suspect in an Isla Vista, California, shooting that killed seven, including the shooter, May 23.

“I will be a god compared to you,” Rodger declares in the haunting video posted to YouTube only hours before the shooting. “You are
animals, and I will slaughter you like animals. I’ll be a god,
exacting my retribution.”

Watching too much porn may be bad for your brain

Editorial:  All mental/visual tasks not only affect the brain but body and spirit as well—either positively or negatively

Men who report watching a lot of pornography tend to have less volume and activity in regions of the brain linked to rewards and motivation, says a new German study.

It’s not clear, for example, whether watching porn leads to brain changes or whether people born with certain brain types watch more porn, said Simone Kühn, the study’s lead author from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, in an email.