Breast cancer cases in U.S. projected to rise as much as 50% by 2030

New breast cancer cases in the U.S. are forecast to rise by as much as 50% by 2030, government researchers reported Monday.

But while the surge in cases will pose “a huge challenge” to medical providers over the coming decades, coauthor Philip S. Rosenberg, of the National Cancer Institute said, the data also revealed “one silver lining”: lower incidence of the subtype known as estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancers, including difficult-to-treat HER2-positive and triple-negative types.

New breast cancer treatment wipes out tumors in just 11 DAYS, ‘staggering’ trial reveals

A new treatment for breast cancer has completely eradicated tumors in just 11 days.

Doctors today described the unexpected results as ‘staggering’ – and said the new two-pronged technique could spare thousands of women from grueling chemotherapy.

Women who were newly diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer were given the therapy at 23 UK hospitals.

Of the participants in the trial the vast majority – 87 per cent – responded to the treatment, with tests showing that the cancer had stopped producing more cells. But for some women the results were more dramatic. In 11 per cent the tumors had completely vanished, to the surprise of surgeons, and for another 17 per cent they had significantly shrunk.

 

Breast cancer cases in U.S. projected to rise as much as 50% by 2030

New breast cancer cases in the U.S. are forecast to rise by as much as 50% by 2030, government researchers reported Monday.

But while the surge in cases will pose “a huge challenge” to medical providers over the coming decades, coauthor Philip S. Rosenberg, of the National Cancer Institute said, the data also revealed “one silver lining”: lower incidence of the subtype known as estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancers, including difficult-to-treat HER2-positive and triple-negative types.

 

Chemicals in soap can cause male infertility

Editorial: Health folks have known this for years! plus, many more typical things we consume are killing us.

Scientists find that sperm cells are affected by chemicals in household products.  Chemicals in common household products such as toothpaste, soap and plastic toys have a direct impact on human sperm which could help  explain rising levels of male infertility, scientists have found.